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Thursday, June 27, 2013

On the Road, Off the Phone
June 24 - June 30, 2013



The National Safety Council (NSC) calls on all Americans to get involved in the Decade of Action for Road Safety 2011 – 2020, an initiative of the World Health Organization. The Decade seeks to prevent road traffic deaths and injuries that experts project will take the lives of 1.9 million people annually by 2020.

Cell phone distracted driving, now joins alcohol and speeding as a leading cause of car crashes. NSC estimates almost 25% percent of crashes involve cell phone use while driving. 


Driving is a privilege. A driver’s license gives you a certain level of freedom, but it also gives you an enormous amount of responsibility.

When behind the wheel this responsibility comes in many forms:

•Always wear a safety belt
•Don't text or talk on the phone while driving

•Make sure all passengers are wearing their safety belt before beginning to drive.
•Don't drink alcohol and drive. Designate a "non-drinking" driver.
•Never get in a car with an intoxicated driver. 
•Don't eat and drive

•Focus on the road
•Drive defensively
•Plan ahead and allow enough times for delays to avoid aggressive driving

The role of NSC includes 
monitoring crash trends. When drivers engage in behaviors that increase crash rates and risks, NSC takes action.

In January 2009, NSC called for a nationwide ban on all cell phone use while driving. This comes after NSC researchers and statisticians reviewed more than 50 peer-reviewed research reports, many drawing the same conclusion.

Drivers who use their cell phones have a significantly increased chance of 
getting into a car crash.

For more information, visit the
National Safety Council














Wednesday, June 26, 2013

June, National Papaya Month

The papaya (also known as papaw or pawpaw) is the fruit of the plant Carica papaya.  The papaya is a melon like fruit with yellow-orange flesh. The skin varies in color from green to orange to rose. Papayas are a good source of vitamin A, vitamin C, and dietary fiber.


The ripe fruit of the papaya is usually eaten raw, with or without skin or seeds. The unripe green papaya can be eaten cooked.  

Green papaya is used in Southeast Asian cooking to make curries, salads, and stews. The black seeds of the papaya are edible and have a spicy taste. They are sometimes ground and used as a substitute for black pepper. In parts of Asia, the young leaves of the papaya are steamed and eaten like spinach.

Green papaya fruit is rich in papain, a protease used as a meat tenderizer. Papain is also applied topically to treat cuts, rashes, stings and burns. Papain ointment is commonly made from fermented papaya flesh, and is applied as a gel-like paste.

Selection
Look for papayas that are partly or completely yellow in color, depending on variety, that give slightly to pressure, but are not soft at the stem-end. Avoid papayas that are bruised, shriveled, or have soft areas. Papayas that are hard and green are immature and will not ripen properly. Uncut papayas have no smell. Papayas that are cut should smell sweet.

Storage
Slightly green papayas will ripen quickly at room temperature, especially if placed in a paper bag. As the papaya ripens, it will turn from green to yellow. Place ripe papayas in a plastic bag and store in the refrigerator. Papayas will keep for up to a week, but it's best to use them within a day or two.


Recipe
Papaya Salad with Tomatoes, Onions,
Peppers, Brown Rice, Black Beans







In the Disney film, The Jungle Book (1967), 
Baloo sings the song "The Bare Necessities."
Can you locate the papaya in the song?

Resources
Fruits and Veggies, More Matters. Papaya
Wikipedia, Carica papaya
Analysis prepared using ESHA, Food Processor


Tuesday, June 25, 2013

June 25, National Strawberry Parfait Day

June 25 is designated as National Strawberry Parfait Day. Parfaits are associated with high calories, but with portion planning you can turn a parfait into a healthy snack.

Strawberry Parfait with Granola
Ingredients.
1/4 cup Light Strawberry Ice Cream
1 Tablespoon Granola
1/4 cup Strawberries, chopped
1/2 cup Strawberries

Nutrition Information.
 97 Calories; 2 g Protein; 18 g Carbohydrates; 2 g Dietary Fiber; 2 g Fat (g); 5 mg Cholesterol;  49 mg Vitamin C; 70 mcg Folate; 34 mg Sodium

Strawberry Parfait with
Frozen Strawberry Yogurt and Granola
Ingredients.
1/3 cup Light Frozen Strawberry Yogurt
2 Tablespoon Granola
1/4 cup Strawberries, chopped
1/2 cup Strawberries
1.5 teaspoons Strawberry Preserves

Nutrition Information. 165 Calories; 3 g Protein; 34 g Carbohydrates; 2 g Dietary Fiber; 3 g Fat (g); 7 mg Cholesterol; 49 mg Vitamin C; 120 mcg Folate; 48 mg Sodium


Sunday, June 23, 2013

Potty Training Awareness Month
Preventing Constipation




June is Potty Training Awareness Month. Constipation in children is a common problem when potty training. Constipation is often characterized by infrequent bowel movements or hard, dry stools.

Causes of Constipation in Children

Toilet Training and Withholding. Your child may ignore the urge to have a bowel movement because of fear of the toilet or they don’t want to take a play break. Some children withhold when they are away from home because they are embarrassed to use a public bathroom. Withholding bowel movements sometimes results in a large painful mass of stool in the rectum called a fecal impaction. If it hurts to have a bowel movement, your child may try to avoid a repeat of the uncomfortable situation. If you begin toilet training too early, children may hold in there stools, which can quickly become an involuntary habit that's tough to break.

Dietary Changes. Lack of fruits and vegetables or fluid in your child's diet may cause constipation. For some children, too much milk and not enough water can lead to constipation.

Medication or Disease. Certain antacids, antidepressants, muscle relaxants and various other drugs can contribute to constipation. Changes in your child's appetite or diet due to illness may have the same effect.

Emotional Pressure to use the toilet or to give up diapers.

Symptoms of constipation in children
*Fewer bowel movements than usual.
*The child is fidgeting, clenching buttocks muscles or other unusual dancelike behaviors.
*Experiencing Abdominal pain and cramping.
*Painful or difficult bowel movements.
*Hard, dry, or large stools.
*Feces in the child’s underwear.
Prevention of constipation in children
*Offer high-fiber foods. Include: Fruits and Vegetables; Beans and Lentils; Bran sprinkled on cereals or yogurt; Whole grain bread and cereal; Dried or soft fruit added to muffins or cereal; Fruit spread

If your child does not like vegetables, serve them hidden in casseroles, pastas or puree in soups. Ask your child to help out when preparing meals. Children are more willing to eat their food if they play a role in making their own meals.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends the following amounts of fiber needed per age and gender. Pediatric Nutrition Handbook, 6th ed. Elk Grove Village (IL): American Academy of Pediatrics; 2009
Age/Gender            Fiber (grams)
2 - 3 years                      19
4 – 8 years                      25
9 – 11 years (female)       26
9 – 11 years (male)          31

*Encourage your child to drink plenty of fluids. Water is the best choice.
*Establish regular meal and snack times
*Promote physical activity. Regular physical activity helps stimulate normal bowel function.
*Create a toilet schedule. Set aside time after meals for your child to use the toilet.
*Remind your child to use the bathroom.
*Ask your doctor if your child is taking any medication that may cause constipation.

Treatment of Constipation in Children
*Follow the prevention instructions.
*Consult with the pediatrician or family doctor before using over-the-counter suppositories or laxatives.
*Contact the doctor if four or five days have passed without a bowel movement, or if constipation is accompanied by abdominal pain, vomiting or fever.
*Consult a dietitian who can help create an appropriate food plan high in fiber.

Resouces
Foods to Boost Your Child’s Fiber, Nourish Interactive (pdf)
American Academy of Pediatrics
International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

This young child describes his concerns about Potty Training
 

 Potty Training Tips from Parents TV - For Mom
 

Elmo and his Father show How
Potty Time Can Be Fun: Sesame Street
 
 















The information presented here does not constitute medical advice for any individual. Specific cases may vary. Dietitians-Online and Weighing-Success recommends readers consult a qualified health professional on an individual basis. All materials are provided for your information only and may not be construed as medical advice or instruction. Readers should consult appropriate health professionals on any matter relating to their health and well-being.


Friday, June 21, 2013

June 21, 2013 Take Your Dog To Work Day
Health Benefits of Having a Dog





Pet Sitters International’s Take Your Dog To Work Day® was created to celebrate the great companions dogs make and to encourage their adoption from humane societies, animal shelters and breed rescue clubs. This annual event asks pet lovers to celebrate the humane-canine bond and promote pet adoption by encouraging employers to support “Take Your Dog to Work Day”.

On Friday June 21, 2013 businesses, animal shelters and pet-care professionals from around the world will work together to better the lives of shelter dogs everywhere. Pet Sitters International invites your business to participate in this fun and worthwhile event.

For nearly 25 years, research has shown that living with pets provides certain health benefits. Pets help lower blood pressure and lessen anxiety. They boost our immunity. "Studies have shown that Alzheimer's patients have fewer anxious outbursts if there is an animal in the home," says Lynette Hart, PhD, associate professor at the University of California at Davis School of Veterinary Medicine.
Health Benefits of a Dog

Studies have found that:

• Pet owners are less likely to suffer from depression than those without pets.
• People with pets have lower blood pressure in stressful situations than those without pets.
• Playing with a pet can elevate levels of serotonin and dopamine, which calm and relax.
• Pet owners have lower triglyceride and cholesterol levels than those without pets.
• Heart attack patients with pets survive longer than those without.
• Pet owners over age 65 make 30 percent fewer visits to their doctors than those without pets.

Caring for a pet can help 
with those healthy lifestyle changes by:
• Increasing exercise. Exercise doesn’t have to involve boring repetition at a gym. Taking a dog for a walk, riding a horse, or simply chasing a kitten around are fun ways to fit healthy daily exercise into your schedule.
• Providing companionship. Isolation and loneliness can make disorders such as depression even worse. Caring for a living animal can help make you feel needed and wanted, and take the focus away from your problems. Most pet owners talk to their pets, some even use them to work through their troubles.
• Helping meet new people. Pets can be a great social lubricant for their owners. Dog owners frequently stop and talk to each other on walks or in a dog park. Pet owners also meet new people in pet stores, clubs, and training classes.
• Reducing anxiety. The companionship of a dog can offer comfort, help ease anxiety, and build self-confidence for people anxious about going out into the world.
• Adding structure and routine to your day. Many pets, especially dogs, require a regular feeding and exercise schedule. No matter your mood—depressed, anxious, or stressed—you’ll always have to get out of bed to feed, exercise, and care for your pet.
• Providing sensory stress relief. Touch and movement are two healthy ways to quickly manage stress. This could involve petting a cat or taking a dog for a walk.

Pets and older adults
The key to aging well is to effectively handle life’s major changes, such as retirement, the loss of loved ones, and the physical changes of aging. Pets can play an important role in healthy aging by:
• Helping you find meaning and joy in life. As you age, you’ll lose things that previously occupied your time and gave your life purpose. You may retire from your career or your children may move far away. Caring for a pet can bring pleasure and help boost your morale and optimism. Taking care of an animal can also provide a sense of self-worth.
• Staying connected. Maintaining a social network isn’t always easy as you grow older. Retirement, illness, death, and moves can take away close friends and family members. And making new friends can get harder. Dogs especially are a great way for seniors to spark up conversations and meet new people.
• Boosting vitality. You can overcome many of the physical challenges associated with aging by taking good care of yourself. Pets encourage playfulness, laughter, and exercise, which can help boost your immune system and increase your energy.


Resources and References
Facebook. Take your dog to work
5 Ways Pets Can Improve Your Health
The Therapeutic Benefits of Pets
Take Your Dog To Work Day
Pet Sitters International


Thursday, June 20, 2013

June 20, National Vanilla Milkshake Day


   Vanilla Milkshake Makeover


       


Vanilla Milkshake, an all-time favorite does not have to be loaded with calories, fat, cholesterol and sugar.

Today’s recipe makeover transforms Paula Deen’s Vanilla Milkshake into a healthier alternative.


Vanilla Milkshake Makeover
Nutrition
Information
Paula Deen's Vanilla MilkshakeVanilla Milkshake MakeoverMakeover Savings
Calories718148570
Carbohydrates (g)732251
Total Sugars (g)731756
Fat (g) 403.536.5
Cholesterol (mg)25222230
Sodium (mg)19311083

Vanilla Milkshake (Original)
Recipe by Paula Deen
Serves 4

Ingredients
4 cups quality vanilla ice cream
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
8 tablespoons sugar
2 cups milk, less for thicker milkshakes

Directions
Using a blender or milkshake machine, blend all ingredients together until smooth. Serve in tall glasses with a straw.

Nutrition Information
Calories (kcal) 718; Carbohydrates (g) 73; Total Sugars (g) 73; Fat (g) 40; Cholesterol (mg) 252; Sodium (mg) 193


Vanilla Milkshake (Makeover)
Serves 4, serving size 8 ounces

Ingredients
2 cups vanilla ice cream (light, used Edy's)
1 teaspoons vanilla extract
2 cups skim milk
Artificial sweetner to taste (optional)
Crushed Ice, as needed for a thicker shake

Directions
Using a blender, blend all ingredients together until smooth. Serve in eight ounce glasses with a straw.

Nutrition Information
Calories (kcal) 148; Carbohydrates (g) 22; Total Sugars (g) 17; Fat (g) 3.5; Cholesterol (mg) 22; Sodium (mg) 110


Wednesday, June 19, 2013

June is National Dairy Month


Every Age Needs the Nutrients Found in Dairy



A Tribute to the Dairy Industry:
From the Cow and the Farmer to Your Kitchen Table.



Nutrition and Health

Milk, cheese and yogurt play a critical role in the diets of adults and children by providing essential nutrients. Drinking one cup of milk can help you meet the Dietary Guidelines for Americans’ recommended three servings of low-fat or fat-free milk or milk products per day.

One cup (8-ounce) serving of milk provides the following nutrients: (Information based on one cup fat-free white milk)

Calcium, provides 30% of the Daily Value. Calcium helps build and maintain bones and teeth. It plays a role in nerve function, muscle contraction and blood clotting.

Vitamin D, provides about 25% of the Daily Value. Vitamin D helps promote the absorption of calcium and enhances bone mineralization.

Protein, provides about 16% of the Daily Value and all of the essential amino acids. Protein builds and repairs muscle tissue and is a source of energy during intense physical activities.

Vitamin B12, provides about 22% of the Daily Value. Vitamin B12 helps build red blood cells that carry oxygen from the lungs to the muscles.

Riboflavin (Vitamin B2), provides about 26% of the Daily Value. Riboflavin helps convert food into energy. It is also involved in exercising muscles.

Phosphorus, provides about 25% of the Daily Value. Phosphorus helps strengthen bones.



Easy to Prepare Snacks




National Dairy Council

The National Dairy Council provides user friendly nutrition education materials. They are advocates for healthy living and committed to our communities and health care needs. 

National Dairy Council® (NDC) is the nutrition research, education and communications arm of Dairy Management Inc™. On behalf of U.S. dairy farmers, NDC provides science-based nutrition information to, and in collaboration with, a variety of stakeholders committed to fostering a healthier society, including health professionals, educators, school nutrition directors, academia, industry, consumers, and media.

Established in 1915, NDC is comprised of a staff of nutrition science researchers, registered dietitians and communications experts dedicated to educating the public on the health benefits of consuming milk and milk products throughout a person’s lifespan. In addition, NDC funds independent research to aid in the ongoing discovery of information about dairy foods’ important role in a healthy lifestyle. This research provides insights to industry for new dairy product innovation.

In partnership with its network of state and regional dairy councils, NDC disseminates nutrition programs, materials and research to support government recommendations for improved nutrition for Americans, including consumption of at least three servings of low-fat or fat-free milk and milk products a day.



Programs, Blogs and More from the National Dairy Council.

Blog. The Dairy Report
3-Every-Day™, a Dairy Promotion. Consuming 3-Every-Day™ of Dairy – three daily servings of milk, cheese, or yogurt is an easy way for families to get a powerful punch of nutrients to help build stronger bones and healthy bodies and reduce the risk of osteoporosis. In addition, a growing body of research suggests that enjoying three servings of dairy foods a day as part of a nutrient-rich, balanced diet may help maintain a healthy weight.

American Dairy Association of Indiana's
 Every Single Day TV Spot.



Fuel Up to Play 60 is an in-school nutrition and physical activity program launched by National Dairy Council (NDC) and National Football League, in collaboration with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). The program encourages youth to consume nutrient-rich foods (low-fat and fat-free dairy, fruits, vegetables and whole grains) and achieve 60 minutes of physical activity every day. Visit the Fuel Up to Play 60 website to learn more.

Jill (Rockstar Nutritionist) Performs with the New York Jets
in Support of Fuel Up to Play 60





Lactose Intolerance.


Lactose Intolerance Health Education Kit


 Celebrating America's Dairy Industry

From Dairy Farming Today:
Dairy farms incorporate many sustainable practices that
minimize their impact on the environment.



Messages from the Dairy Councils and Associations

American Dairy Farmers, 1990’s


Maine Dairy and Nutrition Council


Got Milk? Campaign encourages the consumption of cow's milk and was created by the advertising agency Goodby Silverstein and Partners for the California Milk Processor Board in 1993. It was later licensed for use by milk processors and dairy farmers. You may want to stop by and visit their website. It is colorful, interactive and has great information

Got Milk?


Sponsored by the American Dairy Farmers

Tribute to the Dairy Advertisers.

I’m not sure who gets the credit for the Cow Tap Dancing,
but the Message is Milk gets you swinging again.

1977 Dannon Yogurt Commercials "Georgians Over 100"



Tuesday, June 18, 2013

June 18, International Picnic Day



June 18 is International Picnic Day; an informal food holiday. The day is celebrated where food is brought from home or a market and eaten outdoors. 

The origin of picnic day dates back to the medieval times. After a successful hunt, people would gather outside for a picnic. It is possible International Picnic Day was developed and promoted to bring families together for outside activities, family reunions, exercise, relaxation, and an appreciation of nature.


Traditional foods serves on International Picnic Day include such dishes as salads, sandwiches, beverages, and desserts. If a grill is available, include cooked meats, fish, poultry, and vegetables. 


Food Safety is Important for a Successful Picnic
*Pack beverages in one cooler and perishable foods in another.
*Limit the number of times the cooler is opened so as to keep the contents cold longer.

*Be sure to keep raw meat, poultry, and seafood securely wrapped. This keeps their juices from contaminating prepared and cooked foods or foods that will be eaten raw, such as fruits and vegetables.
*Rinse fresh fruits and vegetables under running tap water before packing them in the cooler.
*Keep food properly chilled in a cooler and don’t let food sit out for more than two hours (one hour if the temperature is 90º F or higher).



June 18, International Sushi Day
Sushi Safety






Sushi is rich in omega-3s and healthy fatty acids. There are several different types of sushi: 

Nigiri Sushi. Mounds of sticky rice are wrapped or layered with seafood and other ingredients

Maki Sushi. Sticky rice and other ingredients are rolled into a cylinder, using thin sheets of dried seaweed.

Sashimi. Sliced raw fish, served with a variety of condiments.

Condiments for Sushi
Soy sauce. Many people blend some of the wasabi with soy sauce to make a tasty dipping sauce for their sushi.

Wasabi. Japanese horseradish, and it's HOT; comes as a powder that you make into a thick, bright green paste by adding liquid

Pickled Ginger. Used to help cleanse the palate and offer relief from the hot wasabi.

Sushi Safety
How safe is the raw fish in sushi? 
Commercial freezing for at least 72 hours at 4 degrees Fahrenheit kills the parasitic worms and their larvae. Note, home freezers usually cannot reach temperatures this low. 

Precautions: 
• Order sushi from reputable restaurants, where the restaurant and fish provider follow food safety standards. 
• Eating fish cooked completely is always the safest. 
• The FDA recommends pregnant or individuals with compromised immune systems (young children, the elderly, and persons with chronic illness) should not risk eating raw fish. 
• Never make your own sushi with raw fish unless you can freeze the fish for more than 72 hours at 4 degrees Fahrenheit. Instead, use cooked fish or vegetables. 
 Proper handling and preparation are crucial to ensure the safety of sushi made with raw fish. 
•  After purchasing raw seafood, fish, and sushi rice; refrigerate immediately below 41ºF until ready to serve. 
•  Preparing rice with vinegar lowers the pH and helps slow the rate of bacterial growth. 
•  Once sushi rolls and sashimi are prepared, refrigerate immediately until serving.  •  Cross-contamination is a concern since sushi is made with both raw and cooked fish. To prevent cross-contamination, raw and cooked fish must be physically separated during preparation. Use different utensils, cutting boards, and surfaces.